An Excerpt About Colorado Boulevard

I recently wrote about Colorado Boulevard for a class I’m taking called ‘American Cultural Landscapes’; instead of writing a full post, here’s an excerpt from what I wrote for my class:

…Eagle Rock, however, is not much different from most of Los Angeles in that it is car dependent, and in many ways Colorado Boulevard serves as a microcosm for streets throughout the city– the street is excessively wide, speeds are high, and sidewalks are empty. Prior to car dominance on the road, LA Railway had a trolley running down the center of Colorado until the late 1940s when the tracks were removed, and more space was turned over to cars, a change that also occurred with many other streets in Los Angeles. As motoring became increasingly popular throughout the years Colorado Boulevard’s businesses reflected the increased car use– gas stations and auto repair shops lined the boulevard. As romanticized views of an automobile culture grew throughout America for much of the 1900s, Eagle Rock again was no different. However, car-use was perhaps further perpetuated through Eagle Rock than other communities when Colorado was part of Route 66 between 1934 and 1936. The influence of Route 66 on Colorado Boulevard’s development spurred auto centric burger joints, diners, motels and oversized signage on establishments– many of these architectural elements have stayed intact and identifiable over the years. Longtime residents still look back fondly on Eagle Rock’s hot motoring era…