Eagle Rock Walking Tour on November 23

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On Sunday, November 23, Walk Eagle Rock will be hosting a walking tour around the neighborhood to explore the town’s history on foot. The family-friendly 5 mile route will be a shorter (and slightly modified) version of the walk led two months ago in August.

Below are the details, and feel free to RSVP to the event on Facebook:

Community and Civic Engagement in Eagle Rock

  • Date: Sunday, November 23, 2014
  • Time: 10:00AM-12:00PM
  • Location: 2035 Colorado Blvd (Eagle Rock City Hall)
  • Walking Tour Length: 5 miles
  • Event is free and open to the public. Restrooms/water fountains will be available at mile 1 and 3.
  • Attendees are encouraged to wear comfortable walking shoes and bring cash for lunch after the walk.
  • Questions? Email us at walkeaglerock@gmail.com

We hope to see you there and stay tuned for additional walking tours exploring different parts of the neighborhood in 2015!

For a More Crossable Colorado Boulevard

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Colorado Boulevard before it went on a road diet (left) and after (right)

It may be hard to believe, but it has already been a year since Colorado Boulevard went on a “road diet,” gaining new crosswalks and buffered bike lanes in the process. The road diet, for those who may no remember, was officially completed in October 2013.

The changes along Colorado Boulevard have primarily been championed by the local non-profit organizations Take Back The Boulevard (TBTB) and The Eagle Rock Association (TERA), but reflect only one aspect of a grander vision to transform the boulevard into a delightful pedestrian-friendly commercial street.

While Colorado Boulevard gained two crosswalks during the road diet last year, TBTB would still like to see more crosswalks. Anecdotal experience along the boulevard suggests many of the shoppers and restaurant-goers feel the same way. There remain a few key intersections where pedestrians continuously cross the street to reach their destination. This post will highlight where these intersections are and explore the impact crosswalks would have.

Colorado Boulevard and Vincent Ave

Whether it is to have brunch at Le Petit Beaujolais in the mornings, or picking up pizza from Casa Bianca in the evenings, this intersection is used throughout the day. The reason, based on observation, is that the availability of parking on the north and south side of the Colorado Boulevard fluctuates. Sometimes there is more parking available on the north side of the street but one’s destination is on the south side. Conversely, sometimes there is parking on the south side but one’s destination is on the north side. A crosswalk here seems appropriate and well-warrented to encourage a more pedestrian-friendly Colorado Boulevard.

Unfortunately, for any crosswalk to be installed, some curbside parking must be lost. This is because adequate sight-lines must be provided so drivers can see pedestrians who intend to cross. While necessary, the amount of parking-prohibited curbside space the city requires almost completely negates the benefit a crosswalk in this situation would provide. The benefit of a crosswalk here is that it allows one to park their car, and then cross the street. However, if too much parking is lost, there may not be that open space to use in the first place. It is for this reason that crosswalk placement must be very carefully thought out.

The below placement seems it would be optimal in serving the natural desire to cross and adhering to the city’s sight-line requirements.
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As noted by the red line in the illustration, a crosswalk located here would require the loss of 3 parking spaces immediately east of the crosswalk on the north side of the street to satisfy the city’s standards. No parking would be lost on the south side. The parking lost could potentially be offset to a degree by slightly shortening the bus-zone at Colorado Boulevard/Mt. Royal Drive to add a parking space on that end of the block.

Colorado Boulevard and La Roda Avenue

This intersection is also a popular space to cross. Fortunately, due to the existing configuration, it appears a crosswalk could be added here with losing no more than 1 parking space (the one immediately west of the crosswalk on the north side might have to go if a crosswalk here is added).
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Colorado Boulevard and Shearin Avenue

Although a crosswalk was added to just a block away at Glen Iris Avenue, this intersection remains a spot where people are frequently seen running across to get food at one of the many popular restaurants in the area. A crosswalk appears it could be added at the expense of two parking space in front of The Oinkster on the north side of the street.
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Fortunately, The Oinkster has its own parking lot, which can accommodate about two dozen patrons. The loss here is not as significant as it would be in front of a business with no parking lot, but it would still be felt. The loss in parking is not ideal, but the hope is that it can make it easier for people to park further from their destination and comfortably (and safely) cross the street to get where they are going. The added crosswalk here might – as it hopefully would at the other two locations – also encourage more locals to simply stroll over from their home to a local restaurant, knowing they don’t have to walk an extra 500 feet out of their way to use a safe, marked crosswalk.

Eagle Rock Walking Tour on August 23

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In March, LA Walks hosted a walking tour of Eagle Rock. On August 23, 2014 we at Walk Eagle Rock will host our own walking tour.

It was not long ago in March that Los Angeles Walks hosted a walking tour of our neighborhood. Topics of interest ranging from architectural landmarks to transportation history and recent civic improvements were covered by two knowledgable local guides. We here at Walk Eagle Rock have long discussed the possibility of hosting walking tours and we are pleased to announce that on August 23, 2014 we will finally be doing so.

As the environmental impact report (EIR) comment period for the Scholl Canyon Landfill is coming to a close (the deadline is August 29), we think it would be appropriate to host a walk focused on community and civic engagement. Eagle Rock has a long history of being an active community and it certainly would not be as fantastic as it is today without the efforts of residents taking the time to participate, on all levels, to improve the neighborhood.

Find the details of our walk below and (if you would like) RSVP to our Facebook event:

Community and Civic Engagement in Eagle Rock

  • Date: Saturday, August 23, 2014
  • Time: 9:00AM-12:00PM
  • Location: 2035 Colorado Blvd (Eagle Rock City Hall)
  • Walking Tour Length: 6 miles
  • Event is free and open to the public. Restrooms/water fountains will be available at mile 2 and 4.
  • Questions? Email us at walkeaglerock@gmail.com

A Lot of Green

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The triangular surface parking lot outside of Delevan Elementary (visible in background). A row of trees planted in the parkway along Wawona Street visually obscure the park lot’s bleakness. Image via: Google Maps

Surface parking lots are seldom thought to be aesthetically pleasing. In fact, whether they are empty or cluttered with cars, the oil-stained asphalt areas are often considered downright ugly. Residents of Northeast LA – newcomers and old-timers alike – upon seeing photographs of beautiful buildings that once stood where strip-malls and surface parking lots exist today frequently lament the architectural losses. The damage can be observed throughout the neighborhood but there is no turning back to prevent the mistakes of the past.

Nowadays, locals are much more tuned into local development plans and it is difficult to imagine any existing buildings being demolished to create strip-malls or parking lots. Along  much of Colorado Boulevard in Eagle Rock such development plans are explicitly prohibited thanks to the Colorado Boulevard Specific Plan. But there is no denying that we must live with many of the surface parking lots we have today into the foreseeable future, either out of necessity or because development can take decades to transform an area since it happens incrementally on a case-by-case basis.

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2 Possible Solutions For a 5-Way Intersection

Poorly marked crosswalk makes an unclear intersection more uncomfortable for pedestrians. Via: Google Maps

It could be you were driving to the 2 Freeway entrance on Wawona Street. Or perhaps biking to Fresh & Easy down on Eagle Rock Boulevard. Or, maybe, you saw families walking to and from Delevan Drive Elementary. If you live in the southwestern portion of Eagle Rock, have regular business that takes you to the area, or simply pass through for regional travel, chances are you are familiar with the bizarre five-way intersection of York Boulevard, Avenue 42, and Valley Vista Drive.

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An aerial view of the intersection of York, Ave 42, and Valley Vista. Via: Google Maps

To be sure, Northeast LA is home to many unusual streets and intersections due to the local topography, but five-way intersections are still a bit of an oddity here. The York-Avenue 42-Valley Vista intersection can be particularly problematic because it is so  heavily traveled compared to other odd intersections, which tend to be on residential streets with very little through traffic. A quick scan of UC Berkeley’s Transportation Injury Mapping System reveals that this intersection has not seen many reported collisions but this does not mean the intersection is perfect, free of conflict, or even safe. Anecdotally, users of the intersection experience several issues, including: Continue reading

Have A Seat

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Two people lean against the exterior of The Coffee Table and soak in the sun

The above photo – depicting two people leaning on the exterior of The Coffee Table on Colorado Boulevard in Eagle Rock – was tweeted from the Walk Eagle Rock Twitter account on April 1, 2014. Within a couple hours it received 7 retweets and 8 favorites. The caption attached to the photo read “Eagle Rock could use more public seating. People are hungry for places to sit and enjoy the street.” 

Considering most tweets from the Walk Eagle Rock account receive no feedback, this picture seemed to resonate with people, and maybe there’s a good reason. Presently Colorado Boulevard, while it features some outdoor dining, offers no outdoor public seating for those looking to spend time on the boulevard. While Eagle Rock’s main street has new crosswalks and a growing number of thriving local businesses, there are few opportunities to comfortably sit outside, people-watch, and enjoy public life in the beautiful community we are fortunate to live in.

This is a bit of a shame, since people sitting and enjoying the sidewalk help bring the street to life. Look what happens on days Casa Bianca is open…
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San Fernando Road Diet

San Fernando Road, the street students at the Sotomayor Learning Academies travel on to get to school. Image via: Google Maps

The students at the LA River School have a simple request– make the street their school is on, San Fernando Road, safe.

San Fernando Road is an unfriendly street, and students have documented this through a collaboration with the local news outlet KCET. The students even created a twitter account promoting their campaign, appropriately named “Restless Road,” which they have used to contact local city agencies and council members.

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